DECISIONS, DECISIONS
– As mentioned, buying a car is a big financial decision, and we can’t presume to dictate what meets your needs. Admittedly, efficient is good, more efficient is better, and we’re all in favor of zero-emission options here at MEC (yes, we’re somewhat biased). Even setting aside the positive environmental impact moving away from petroleum creates, we believe that the case for electric vehicles is solid in terms of dollars and cents alone.  Your savings on fuel and maintenance over the lifetime of the vehicle can easily total thousands or tens of thousands of dollars.

But in the end, the choice to switch from gasoline or diesel to an EV or PHEV needs to be a choice that works for you. What this closing installment aims to do is to connect you with resources that can help you run the numbers, check the tech, and learn from the experiences of others.

GETTING STICKY – Remember the last time you were at a car dealership? Remember the stickers on the rear windows of every car – the black & light blue stickers, with the MPG totals?

Sample gasoline vehicle fuel economy label

Yeah, those. All light-duty cars and trucks sold in the US get those numbers from federal laboratories, whatever their fuel. In the case of BEV and PHEV models, you’ll notice a substantial difference between a sticker for a conventional car, particularly when it comes to MPG and fuel costs:

Sample electric vehicle fuel economy label

Handy in and of itself, this sticker is only the tip of the iceberg.  There is plenty of information from federal agencies and laboratories available to prospective owners of any car or truck, powered by any fuel.

Let’s begin with the most popular and comprehensive federal site.  Fuel Economy.gov is jointly supported by the Department of Energy and the EPA.  Once on the homepage, click on the tab labeled “Advanced Cars And Fuels”.  The pop-up that results has no fewer than 47 different linked categories for everything from diesel to hydrogen.

Within these categories, there’s plenty to do. If you’d like to compare EV model to EV model, or compare a Tesla with a Ford F-150, the interface is simple and intuitive. You can find estimates for five-year fuel costs, gallons or kilowatt-hours per 100 miles and even gas tank size. Simple or detailed driving cost calculators, information on tax credits, personal online fuel efficiency tracking (for the slightly obsessive), and plenty more tools are ready to use. The same site also hosts the Fuel Economy Guide, updated every year.  The 2020 edition is now up and ready for free download.

A DIGRESSION IN THE NAME OF FULL DISCLOSURE – Once again, there’s no free lunch. There’s no tailpipe, but most electric cars have a smokestack – the power plant they plugged into. However, the Alternative Fuels Data Center has a calculator that shows how much carbon an average EV puts out in a year.  You can use it to compare EVs with hybrid, PHEV and gasoline options. It’s quite broad, and based on state averages. Even so, it’s fascinating to compare EVs in Missouri (coal-heavy) and Kansas (wind-rich) with their petroleum cousins– to say nothing of the yawning gulf between both states and California.

OWNER INPUT AND WEBSITES GALORE – There are lots of websites and owners’ groups out there. This country abounds in organizations devoted to everything from Hendrix to Hummers to hummingbirds, so it’s no surprise that there is plenty of information available on EVs and PHEVs.

 

THINKING LOCALLY
There is a very active group of EV enthusiasts right here in town.  Members of the Mid-America Electric Auto Association would love to field your questions. Feel free to drop in at their monthly meetings (2nd Sundays at 1:00 at the Johnson County Main Library), or through their Yahoo user group. MAEAA members know all about Kansas City weather – icy winters and blazing summers.  They’re quite familiar with how weather impacts the performance of BEVs and PHEVs.  Actually, it impacts the performance of all vehicles, but that’s a subject for another time.

ONLINE
InsideEVs is great at keeping up with tax credits and incentives, and their monthly sales scorecard is, if not formally approved by the industry, solidly based on monthly sales totals from all manufacturers. It’s also a good site for additional details on charging, financing and other, wonkier topics. Their charts on range, cost and incentives cover all available models and are regularly updated.

Green Car Reports A bit broader in scope, this site covers just about everything faintly green in the auto world. Monthly updates on the best deals available, even for efficient conventional cars are handy.  The “First Drives” series covers new cars on the block, and their daily news updates are useful.

Midwest Evolve Hosted by a consortium of Clean Cities coalitions around the Midwest, ME covers a lot of ground. Their website has plenty of user-friendly breakdowns on EV and PHEV how-to, auto show and test drive events, plus an excellent combination blog/news site.

Electric Auto Association One of the oldest EV organizations out there, the EAA has been promoting electric cars since 1967, when going electric was a 100% DIY proposition. Their website is a bottomless pit of information, particularly their EV Links page. Much of their content leans technical , but there’s plenty applicable to those of us who are still in the “just looking” stage.

These are a few of the  many EV sites out there, whether run by clubs, non-profit organizations or businesses. We cannot vouch for 100% accuracy in what you may find there.  This is especially true in online comments sections, which have an unfortunate tendency to resemble . . . online comments sections.

Section 127(s) of Title 23 of the United States Code, as amended by the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2019 (PL 116-6), increases the weight limit for natural gas vehicles operating on the interstate Highway System by an extra 2,000 lbs. This increases the limit from 80,000 lbs to 82,000 lbs.

Federal Highway Administration issued a departmental memorandum providing further guidance for this weight allowance.

FHWA Guidance includes the following:

  1. State authorities must allow the additional weight on the Interstate Highway System.
  2. State authorities must provide reasonable access to the Interstate.
  3. Weight allowance applies beyond the Gross Vehicle Weight (extends to single axel, tandem axel and bridge weight formulas limits).
  4. Weight allowance must be taken in addition to other weight allowances.

Follow this link below to access the full PDF provided by NVGAmerica. https://www.ngvamerica.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/NGV-Weight-Allowance-Guidance.pdf

District: Grain Valley School District
Industry: Education
Location: Grain Valley, Missouri
Vehicles: (14) 2018 IC Bus CE Series propane autogas-fueled buses
Fueling: On-site propane autogas station

Challenge
With aging diesel buses to replace, a Missouri school district looked to alternative fuel options that would save money on fuel and maintenance.

Result
The Grain Valley School District purchased 14 propane school buses. The new buses joined a 49-bus fleet that transports 2,800 students to school from suburban and exurban neighborhoods.

Focus on Cost-Cutting
Over the years Missouri state reimbursements for school transportation have dropped from 75 percent to 16 to 20 percent. School districts in the state have had to tap their own general school funds to make up the shortfall.

To help save money, the Grain Valley district considered alternative fuels for its new school buses and comparing compressed natural gas (CNG) and propane autogas. District representatives attended an alternative fuels workshop hosted by Kansas City Regional Clean Cities, a Metropolitan Energy Center program. The district considered various fuels but “the vehicle costs and fueling station costs for CNG were much higher versus propane,” said Shawn Brady, director of transportation.

The district decided to purchase 14 propane buses in 2018 to replace diesel buses of 2001 and 2002 model years. Brady researched and applied for a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy through Kansas City Regional Clean Cities to assist with the purchase costs of the buses.

Preparing for Propane Autogas
To fuel the new buses, the district entered into a contract with their local propane provider, Ferrellgas. A fueling station with two 1,000-gallon tanks was built in the school district’s bus parking lot in April 2018. “It saves time not to have to travel to refuel,” Brady noted.

Infrastructure costs for propane are the lowest of any fuel; alternative or conventional. For Grain Valley schools, the start-up cost for the fueling station totaled $16,500. “We received a 45 percent grant from Metropolitan Energy Center for the installation of our propane fueling station,” Brady said. The center’s grant amounted to $7,425. “The fueling station cost us only $9,075 after the grant.”

Before putting the new buses on the district’s routes, drivers received training in propane bus operation. “Our bus vendor provided training on how to properly operate the buses and maximize fuel efficiency,” Brady said. The district’s technicians traveled to the bus manufacturer’s factory in Tulsa, Oklahoma, for a complimentary week-long training course on maintenance. The district didn’t need to make changes to its bus repair facility. Requirements for a propane vehicle service facility are generally the same as those for conventionally fueled vehicles.

Financial Benefits
After tapping grants for purchase assistance, each new bus cost about $250 more than a comparable diesel bus. District officials say that the higher initial cost can be quickly recouped in fuel savings.

In fact, by adding propane buses to its fleet, Grain Valley School District has noted savings on both fuel and maintenance. On average, propane autogas costs up to 50 percent less than diesel. As part of its Grain Valley Schools propane bus and fueling setupnegotiated contract, Grain Valley paid a locked-in rate of $1.20 per gallon of propane in 2018-1019. For the 2019-2020 school year, the district pays $1.15 per gallon. For comparison, the district pays $2.31 per gallon on average for diesel.

Each bus in the district runs about 9,000 miles per year. For the 2018-2019 school year, fuel savings amounted to about $14,500. “The district’s increased savings year after year will allow the transportation department to serve as a better steward of taxpayer money,” said Brady.

Additional savings come from the reduced maintenance. With propane autogas, no exhaust after-treatment or diesel emissions fluids are required like with diesel to meet today’s strict emissions regulations. Propane vehicles don’t need particulate trap systems, turbochargers and intercoolers. Plus, propane uses less engine oil. All these factors contribute to the overall savings of time and money. The district’s technicians like the propane buses, Brady reports. “There are fewer parts and systems to have to maintain.”

However, Brady explained that “warranty work is challenging with no established shop in Kansas City.” He noted that IC does provide a traveling technician who assists his staff when they encounter maintenance issues. Kansas City Regional Clean Cities recommends fleet managers ensure that there is a local service shop to do warranty and continuing work on buses before purchasing.

Even more saving shows up for the district in the winter. Due to the chemical properties of propane autogas, the propane buses warm up faster and have no cold start issues. Unlike diesel vehicles, these buses can start up in temperatures as low as -40 degrees Fahrenheit. School districts report lower electric costs because the propane buses don’t rely on block heaters. “Our propane buses warmed up faster this past winter than the diesel buses,” Brady said.

Beyond the Bottom Line 

Grain Valley’s propane buses are helping the community’s air quality. Unlike diesel buses, propane vehicles emit virtually no particulate matter and, with substantially less nitrogen oxides (NOx). Buses fueled by propane also emit fewer greenhouse gases and total hydrocarbon emissions when compared to diesel buses. Propane’s quiet operation makes riding the bus more pleasant for passengers and safer for drivers, who are less distracted by engine noise. “We’ve benefitted from much cleaner air and much quieter buses running through neighborhoods,” said Brady.

Drivers also report that the propane dispenser pumps are just as fast or faster than the diesel fuel pump when it’s time to fill the tank. The district notes that it will be sure to order buses with 100-gallon fuel tanks going forward. “These were not available from IC when we placed our first order,” Brady said.

The district’s leadership in adopting an alternative fuel earned it a 2018 Agent of Change Award from the Metropolitan Energy Center, a Kansas City nonprofit catalyst for energy efficiency, economic development and environmental vitality.

The district’s plan to purchase seven more propane buses this year, and eventually move to an all-propane fleet, speaks to the administration’s belief in the benefits of this alternative fuel for their students, drivers and overall community.

“Our district made the decision on propane buses to save money. The environmental impact is an added benefit. There’s no reason to not make the move into propane now,” Brady said.

 

About MOPERC: The Missouri Propane Education & Research Council is a not-for-profit organization authorized by the Missouri Legislature. Dedicated to propane education and public awareness, MOPERC provides industry training, consumer safety, appliance rebates and market development programs. The council is composed of 15 volunteer directors and adm inistered by an executive staff. Visit PropaneMissouri.com.

By: Meggan Shoberg

The health and safety of students in the classroom is of crucial importance. According to the U.S. Department of Education, currently 55 million people spend their time in K-12 buildings. That is about 20 percent of our current population! Teachers, students, administration, and staff are all spending a majority of their time indoors, between the walls of these vital buildings. The students who reside in these buildings consume more oxygen than their adult counterparts, and are afflicted by poor indoor air quality, inefficient energy systems and health risks at a higher rate.

Many Midwest schools have been recipients of Energy Star Awards, and that is an amazing first step to creating the best environment for learning. There are a couple of key considerations to make when analyzing your school building’s efficient and indoor air quality:

  1. Energy Star and other energy benchmarking  programs are a standard for adults, not children. So, area schools should be looking to not just achieve minimum standards, but exceed them to accommodate their most vulnerable residents.
  2. Look at the building’s efficiency during occupied periods of time. While over a 24-hour period, a school may warrant acceptable results, these facilities are unoccupied a portion of the time and experience high traffic during school hours. Energy efficiency measures should account for the time that the building is actually using energy, not when it’s sitting dormant. 

Over the next few months, we will be diving into the topic of efficiency, maintenance and indoor air quality of schools. We’ll be covering the benefits, low-cost improvement measures, EPA tools, and how Metropolitan Energy Center is a great partner for your school’s efficiency project. Stay tuned in the coming months as we explore this critical compenent to protecting the health of our students, and contact Meggan@metroenergy.org with questions about how your school can improve its efficiency.